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Course Design Procedures

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Section 1 - Purpose

(1) Course design supports the University’s strategic objective of empowering students through innovative educational experiences that prepare them for their future.

(2) These Procedures have been developed to assist in:

  1. providing information and guidance in designing, developing and/or amending a course and its component elements;
  2. giving effect to the recommendations for reform of the University’s course portfolio set out in the Course Portfolio Principles White Paper; and
  3. ensuring that course naming, course structure and duration, and course content for all UOW Qualifications (Australian Qualifications Framework award courses) meet the requirements as set out in relevant regulatory standards and with University policy requirements.

(3) These Procedures are supported by and operate in conjunction with the academic policy documents regulating teaching and learning and supporting quality enhancement at the University, including the following:

  1. Coursework Rules;
  2. Higher Degree Research (HDR) Award Rules;
  3. Course Policy;
  4. Course and Subject Approval Procedures - New Offerings and Discontinuations;
  5. Course and Subject Approval Procedures (Faculty Delegated Course and Subject Amendments);
  6. Course Monitoring and Review Procedures;
  7. Teaching and Assessment: Subject Delivery Policy;
  8. Teaching and Assessment: Assessment and Feedback Policy;
  9. Credit for Prior Learning Policy and accompanying procedures;
  10. Honours Policy;
  11. ESOS Compliance Policy; and
  12. Conferral and Issuance Policy.
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Section 2 - Scope

(4) These Procedures apply to all UOW accredited award courses.

(5) Short courses and non-award courses that do not lead to an Australian Qualifications Framework award are out of scope of this Procedure. They are managed in accordance with the Short Course and Microcredential Management Procedure.

(6) All new or revised UOW award courses and their components, must adhere to the relevant provisions of the Course Design Procedures on approval or, in the case of existing award courses, following their next scheduled course review.

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Section 3 - ourse Portfolio Principles

(7) The following principles are designed to guide the development and maintenance of a cohesive and purposeful course portfolio at the University and reflect the strategic priority of the University to provide an exceptional learning and student experience.

(8) Each UOW degree should:

  1. form part of an integrated, distinctive and coherent portfolio of courses for the school, the faculty and the University that is attractive to prospective students and provides flexibility in terms of delivery and pathways;
  2. be and remain viable and sustainable;
  3. be designed and delivered consistent with the Higher Education Standards Framework;
  4. be designed to utilise the teaching and research strengths of the academic unit(s) responsible for their design and delivery;
  5. through design and delivery, incorporate work integrated learning and global perspectives;
  6. be distinctive and coherent in terms of its course name, its course learning outcomes and its course structure;
  7. be aligned to one of the following course types (detailed in Appendices 2-12):
    1. Generalist Undergraduate Course;
    2. Profession-Specific / Specialist Undergraduate Course;
    3. Enhanced Course for Academic High-Achievers;
    4. Profession-Specific / Specialist Postgraduate Course;
    5. Higher Degree Research Pathway;
    6. Higher Degree Research Course;
    7. Double Degree Course;
    8. Vertically Integrated Degree Course (Integrated Masters).
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Section 4 - UOW Qualifications

(9) Australian Qualifications Framework qualifications being courses leading to the following higher education awards are offered by the University:

  1. Undergraduate Certificate;
  2. Diploma;
  3. Associate Degree;
  4. Bachelor Degree;
  5. Bachelor Honours Degree;
  6. Graduate Certificate;
  7. Graduate Diploma;
  8. Masters Degree (Coursework);
  9. Masters Degree (Research);
  10. Doctoral Degree.
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Section 5 - Course Naming, Duration and Volume of Learning

(10) Courses and areas of major study must be named as detailed in Appendices 2-12.

(11) All award courses must have a course duration that meets Australian Qualifications Framework requirements. The volume of learning requirements specified in the Australian Qualifications Framework identify the notional duration of all learning activities required for the achievement of learning outcomes specified for a particular AQF qualification. They are expressed in equivalent full-time years.

Credit Points and Equivalent Full-Time Student Loads (EFTSL)

(12) The notional duration and the equivalent full-time student load for each course are calculated using credit points.

(13) For double degree programs, the maximum credit point savings for double degrees are listed in Appendix 6. These savings represent the maximum extent to which learning outcomes from one strand of the double degree can assure learning outcomes for the second strand. Maximum savings will not always be available. For example:

  1. the number of credit points saved by a student may be limited by the prescribed structure of a degree that is a strand of a double degree program;
  2. the saving may not be distributed across both single strands degrees and may be possible in relation to only one of the strands.
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Section 6 - Delivery Modes, Locations and Sessions

On Campus, Mixed Mode and Online Delivery Modes – Course Level

On Campus Course

(14) For delivery of a course to be on campus, all subjects that are required to meet the requirements of the course are available in on campus delivery mode.

Mixed Mode Course (formerly known as ‘Flexible’ Delivery Mode)

(15) For delivery of a course to be mixed mode, the subjects that are required to meet the requirements of the course may be offered in a combination of online, mixed mode and on campus delivery modes. Students have the option to choose on-campus, mixed mode or online subjects as part of their course, provided subjects are available via that or those delivery modes and subject to ESOS compliance requirements noted below.

Online course (formerly known as ‘distance’ delivery mode)

(16) For delivery of a course to be online, all subjects that are required to meet the requirements of the course are available in online delivery mode.

ESOS/CRICOS Requirements for Onshore International Students

(17) All courses offered to onshore international students studying on a student visa must meet relevant requirements of the National Code of Practice for Providers of Education and Training to Overseas Students 2018, with respect to their delivery mode.

(18) Standard 8 of the National Code of Practice for Providers of Education and Training to Overseas Students 2018 provides that:

  1. “8.19 A registered provider must not deliver more than one-third of the units (or equivalent) of a higher education or VET course by online or distance learning to an overseas student.
  2. 8.20 A registered provider must ensure that in each compulsory study period for a course, the overseas student is studying at least one unit that is not by distance or online learning, unless the student is completing the last unit of their course.”

(19) Subjects must be available for courses via on campus and/or mixed modes to enable international onshore students to comply with the requirements set out in the National Code of Practice for Providers of Education and Training to Overseas Students 2018.

On Campus, Mixed Mode and Online Delivery Modes – Subject Level

On Campus Subject

(20) A subject classified as on campus is a subject that requires regular, formal, synchronous learning activities delivered face to face (such as weekly lectures combined with compulsory tutorials, seminars, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, practical demonstrations etc.). On campus delivery may involve the use of online electronic technology as a tool/medium for teaching and learning (e.g., Moodle, Echo 360), that provides students with access to additional or supporting material for teaching and learning.

Mixed Mode Subject (formerly known as Flexible Subject Delivery Mode)

(21) A subject classified as mixed mode is delivered in a combination of both:

  1. compulsory synchronous face to face learning format that will usually be delivered on campus but may be delivered off campus; and
  2. synchronous and/or asynchronous online learning format.

Online Subject (formerly known as Distance Subject Delivery Mode)

(22) A subject classified as online is a subject that has no on-campus attendance requirements, and the delivery of learning is wholly through an online environment, be it synchronous and/or asynchronous. If an online subject requires students to complete a formal in person examination, students may be required to complete the exam at a University campus or an approved exam location.

Principles of Equivalence for Delivery at Offshore Delivery Locations

(23) When designing a course, consideration must be given to the selection of delivery locations (existing or new) taking account of the capacity of the University to provide an equivalent academic experience for students at the delivery location.

(24) The University offers award courses onshore and offshore. Any UOW course, major, specialisation or minor study offered offshore should be equivalent to the onshore offering, having regard to the Principles of Equivalence (Appendix 14).

(25) Specifically, academic items that are offered at the University of Wollongong onshore and offshore must have equivalent learning outcomes having regard to the Principles of Equivalence.

(26) Particular requirements imposed by relevant local higher education accreditation agencies may be approved as variations to the academic item by the relevant Delegated Authority for approval of courses at new delivery locations.

Delivery Sessions

(27) All courses and subjects offered onshore should, where practicable, use the University-approved standard sessions (Autumn, Spring, Summer and Trimesters 1, 2 and 3).

(28) Non-standard sessions can be used where there are sound pedagogical or logistical reasons to do so. Creation of new non-standard sessions is managed under the Sessions Management Policy (under development).

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Section 7 - Course Admission

(29) Details of admission criteria must be specified for each course, including any admission criteria applying to specific prospective student cohorts and/or delivery locations.

(30) Where relevant, admission requirements for different student cohorts (domestic, international, contract) and/or delivery sites must be specified for each course, including:

  1. English language requirements;
  2. academic requirements;
  3. professional experience; and/or
  4. other selection criteria (written application, interview, audition, etc.).

(31) Admission criteria are approved at the point of approval of a course in accordance with the Course and Subject Approval Procedures - New Offerings and Discontinuations and thereafter reviewed and confirmed on an ongoing basis in accordance with the Coursework Rules and the Admissions Procedures (Coursework) and Admissions Procedures (HDR).

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Section 8 - Qualification Pathways and Credit Arrangements

(32) In designing an award course, consideration must be given to the development of qualification pathways such as nested courses and credit arrangements.

Nested Courses

(33) Nested courses are structured to allow students to progress from a lower-level qualification into a higher level qualification or exit a higher level qualification with a lower level qualification.

(34) Each course within a nested set of courses must meet the requirements of the Higher Education Standards Framework (Threshold Standards) 2021, including the specifications for the relevant AQF level. See Appendices 2-12 for requirements.

(35) Each course within a nested set of courses must have learning outcomes aligned to the relevant AQF level and AQF qualification type. See Appendices 2-12 for requirements.

(36) A student admitted to a course at a lower AQF level and who completes the course successfully may be granted a defined amount of credit towards the higher AQF qualification. See Appendices 2-13 for defined credit arrangements for nested courses.

(37) A student enrolled in a higher AQF level course in the nested set of courses may choose to exit with a lower AQF level course qualification provided they have met the requirements for conferral of that qualification.

(38) Nested arrangements may include lower AQF level courses that are exit-only courses. An exit-only course is a course that is not open to general admission. An exit-only course may be made available to a student enrolled in a higher AQF level qualification and who has met the requirements for conferral of that lower AQF level course to allow for a course exit with the lower AQF level exit only qualification.

A nested set of courses can contain up to four levels of qualifications, as shown in Figure 1.

*Note: An undergraduate certificate may be designed at Australian Qualifications Framework Levels 5, 6 or 7 and may as such be nested against different undergraduate qualifications

Credit for Prior Learning

(39) Credit for prior learning enables students to have their prior formal, informal and non-formal learning recognised towards meeting the course learning outcomes in their UOW course. It means students can achieve a reduction in the length and associated cost of their degree.

(40) Course design should consider appropriate credit arrangements, including formal credit arrangements, nesting and articulation (see above) and other means to recognise prior learning. Refer to the Credit for Prior Learning Policy and Credit for Prior Learning Procedures for details.

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Section 9 - Course Structure

(41) A core principle of course design is to provide students with a course structure that introduces, develops and assures learning. Course or curriculum mapping is required to be developed and maintained to demonstrate how the course structure does so, demonstrating the relationship between course (and if applicable, major or specialisation) learning outcomes and the assessments within core and capstone subjects in the course (and the major or specialisation if applicable).

(42) In order for an award course (and the majors or specialisations within it) to meet Australian Qualifications Framework requirements, the University must ensure that each course that leads to a qualification located at Levels 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 or 10 of the Australian Qualifications Framework:

  1. has course learning outcomes and subject learning outcomes that:
    1. are aligned with the relevant AQF qualification type descriptors (refer to Appendices 2-12); and
    2. incorporate achievement of the Generic Learning Outcomes detailed in the Australian Qualifications Framework;
  2. contains assessment at the subject level that demonstrably supports achievement of the subject learning outcomes and, where applicable, the major study and course learning outcomes;
  3. has a duration or volume of learning that, at a minimum, meets Australian Qualifications Framework requirements for the relevant AQF level and qualification type;
  4. has a course award title that is consistent with the Australian Qualifications Framework.

Learning Outcomes

(43) Learning outcomes should be specific to the course of study, measurable, achievable and, within the context of the volume of learning and the resources available, realistic.

(44) Course Learning Outcomes may be supplemented by Major and/or Specialisation Learning Outcomes.

(45) The Course, Specialisation and/or Major Learning Outcomes must embed Australian Qualifications Framework level descriptors and, where they exist, discipline Threshold Learning Outcomes.

(46) Where applicable, professional accreditation requirements and requirements of regulatory and disciplinary bodies both onshore and offshore are also embedded in the Course Learning Outcomes.

(47) Further details on designing Learning Outcomes are set out in section 11 – Assurance of Learning.

Cognate Courses

(48) To comply with the Australian Qualifications Framework, the course structure for cognate courses must be designed to differentiate cognate courses from each other by, for example:

  1. unique core or capstone subject or subjects; or
  2. the volume of learning for one course being different to that for the cognate course, enabling students to undertake additional core and/or elective subjects.

Joint and Dual Awards

(49) Courses and subjects may be designed and delivered with a variety of partner institutions, either onshore and/or offshore as Joint or Dual Awards.

(50) All courses that lead to a Joint or Dual Award will be developed and approved in accordance with the Joint and Dual Awards Policy. Testamurs for Joint Awards will be developed in accordance with the Joint and Dual Awards Policy and the Conferral and Issuance Policy.

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Section 10 - Subject Structure

Subjects and the Australian Qualifications Framework

(51) In order for subjects to be consistent with the Australian Qualifications Framework levels, and subject to the restrictions as set out in the Appendices 2 – 12:

  1. subjects offered in AQF level 5 undergraduate courses will be at 100 Level;
  2. subjects offered in AQF level 6 undergraduate courses will be at 100, 200 and 300 Level;
  3. subjects offered in AQF level 7 and embedded AQF level 8 undergraduate courses will be at 100 Level, 200 Level and 300 and/or 400 Level;
  4. subjects offered in AQF level 8 undergraduate end on honours courses will be at 400 or 800 Level;
  5. subjects offered in AQF level 8 postgraduate courses will be at 400, 800 or 900 Level; and
  6. subjects offered in AQF level 9 postgraduate courses will be at 800 or 900 Level.

(52) Due to limitations in the existing subject database, subjects offered in AQF level 10 postgraduate courses will be designed to meet the requirements of Level 9 and Level 10 of the Australian Qualifications Framework but will be designated as 900 Level and, for the thesis subjects, will have the prefix THES.

Subjects and Credit Points

(53) Subject credit point values attached to subjects are related to the rate at which fees are calculated. Subjects must be designed with the following credit point values (based on numerical values that are factors of 6):

  1. 0 credit points (because of which, no fee may be charged for students to undertake the subject - see clause 65;
  2. 2 credit points;
  3. 3 credit points;
  4. 6 credit points (The standard credit point value for an undergraduate coursework or postgraduate coursework subject);
  5. 12 credit points;
  6. 18 credit points;
  7. 24 credit points; and
  8. 48 credit points.

(54) Clause 53 above does not apply to the graduate Doctor of Medicine (MD).

(55) A 2 and 3 credit point subject should only be offered in exceptional circumstances and should not result in students being unduly inconvenienced in achieving the minimum number of credit points required to be eligible to graduate and/or declare a major study or minor study. Typically, this will require that the course, major or specialisation uses multiple 2 or 3 credit point subjects up to a total of 6 credit points.

(56) Subjects of 12 credit points and above should be used to cater for study at greater depth or for project based or research subjects.

(57) The credit point value of a subject should reflect the work requirements for a subject. Each credit point equates to around 1.5 hours of work (engagement hours involving attendance and self-directed study) per week for a subject delivered in a standard session (10-13 weeks plus study and exam period (if applicable)).

Double-Badging of Subjects

(58) Double-badging of a subject is typically achieved by changes to the subject learning outcomes and to assessment so that the second version of the double badged subject, as delivered, can cater to the needs of students studying at a different AQF qualification level.

(59) Double-badged subjects must be designed to meet the requirements of each cohort students studying at their relevant qualification level and type for the course in which they are enrolled.

(60) Limits on the credit point value of double-badged subjects available in postgraduate courses are set out in Appendix 13.

(61) Postgraduate students should be made aware of double-badged subjects in their course.

Adjustments to Double-Badged Subjects

(62) Double-badging of undergraduate subjects as postgraduate subjects should occur only with the following adjustments to the postgraduate version of the subject:

  1. Varying subject learning outcomes to meet the qualification type descriptors for Level 8 or Level 9 qualifications;
  2. Setting assessment tasks to assure learning appropriate for the qualification type descriptors for Level 8 or Level 9 qualifications and in line with the varied subject learning outcomes; and
  3. Where practicable:
    1. including additional content in the postgraduate version to provide greater breadth or depth of knowledge to meet the qualification type descriptors for Level 8 or Level 9 qualifications and in line with the varied subject learning outcomes; and
    2. providing students in each cohort with separate tutorials, workshops, seminars etc..

Exceptions to the Requirement to make Adjustments

(63) Double-badging of 400 level subjects as 800 level subjects may occur without adjustments to subject learning outcomes or assessment on the basis that the relevant qualifications (Bachelor Honours, Graduate Certificate and Graduate Diploma) sit at the same level of the Australian Qualifications Framework.

(64) Double-badging of 200 and 300 level subjects as 800 level subjects may occur without alteration as set out in Appendix 13 (and therefore at the assurance level of a Level 7 Bachelor’s degree), but only if the subjects are:

  1. offered as foundation or introductory level subjects within a Masters course; or
  2. offered as part of a Level 8 qualification.

(65) In the case of higher degree research degrees double-badging is restricted to 400 level subjects being double badged as 800 level subjects, which may occur as outlined in Appendix 13.

(66) Double-badging of 100 level subjects is not permitted except with the permission of the Delegated Authority and on exceptional grounds (for example, in order to meet the requirements of an accreditation body) .

Zero Credit Point Subjects

(67) Zero credit point subjects are permissible in limited circumstances as provided below. Zero credit point subjects attract no fees and as such, the decision to offer a zero credit point subject must be taken having regard to the revenue and cost implications of doing so, as well as to the capacity to provide appropriate support to students undertaking the subject. A zero credit point subject must be for one of the following purposes:

  1. To maximise student’s potential and learning experience in a specific area that may not be directly related to the discipline specific course content (for example: academic and English language and other communication skills development, mentoring programs).
  2. To provide the knowledge and skills that are determined critical to the course of study and assists in bridging the gap for students before they begin the course of study.
  3. To provide research skills and are embedded as part of a research degree program for Level 10 AQF qualification (for example: Research Methods, Research Principles, and Fundamentals of Research).
  4. To provide formalised content and assessment but where the subject involves minimal resources from the University (related to supervision, delivery, assessment etc.), such as Work Experience in Industry subjects (as defined in the Code of Practice – Work Integrated Learning (Professional Experience)).
  5. To provide for compulsory pre-requisite content.

Cross Counting of Subjects

(68) The design of courses must have regard to the rules on cross counting of subjects set out in the Coursework Rules.

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Section 11 - Assurance of Learning

(69) Assurance of Learning involves a systematic quality assurance process of:

  1. designing learning outcomes;
  2. aligning course learning outcomes with the curriculum; and
  3. gathering and analysing data and monitoring course, major, specialisation and subject performance and student cohort outcomes as part of the process of reviewing and improving courses, majors, specialisations and subjects.

(70) The reflective feedback cycle can be represented as follows:

Designing Learning Outcomes

(71) The expected learning outcomes for each course of study, major or specialisation or subject will:

  1. be clearly expressed, consistent with the field of education and appropriate for the level of the qualification to be awarded, and will have regard to the qualification level and type as set out in the Australian Qualifications Framework;
  2. be informed by national and/or international comparators within the discipline and the Higher Education sector;
  3. meet Higher Education sector standards and, where appropriate, discipline, professional accreditation and industry standards; and
  4. include or refer to employability-related and life-long learning outcomes and other relevant UOW Curriculum Priorities (see section 12), where appropriate.

(72) Assurance of learning tasks and associated learning and teaching activities must be designed in accordance with the University’s Assessment and Feedback Principles and the assessment policy provisions set out in the Teaching and Assessment: Assessment and Feedback Policy.

(73) Internal performance benchmark/s regarding what constitutes acceptable student cohort performance (targets) for each course learning outcome may be determined by the Faculty proposing the course, to provide a standard for each course learning outcome in each course.

Align Learning Outcomes with Curriculum

(74) Courses, majors, specialisations and subjects are designed so that students’ learning goals and the learning outcomes are constructively aligned to assessments and learning activities and contextually aligned with the discipline and the relevant professional environment.

(75) To align with learning outcomes, assurance of learning tasks must be:

  1. located within core subjects of courses, majors or specialisations and in course capstone experiences, or a combination of these (e.g., in a ‘capstone’ assessment and/or an assessment against a set of occupational or professional standards);
  2. described as being ‘taught’, ‘practised’ and ‘assessed’, or described in comparable terms (e.g., where an occupational or professional standard requires a particular term be used); and
  3. mapped to demonstrate where the learning outcomes are assured in the course, major, specialisation or subject.

(76) Learning and teaching activities must be arranged to foster progressive student achievement and the coherent attainment of expected learning outcome, using the nomenclature of learning that is introduced, developed and assured.

(77) Before being assessed, learning outcomes must be taught and practised sufficiently and all learning outcomes must be assessed prior to completion of the course, major, specialisation or subject, exercising judgements on assessments that reflect the level of student achievement.

(78) Learning outcomes that are articulated and mapped, within a course, major, specialisation or subject can only be changed in accordance with the approval process provided for in the Course and Subject Approval Procedures (Faculty Delegated Course and Subject Amendments).

Interim Monitoring and Review

(79) The Teaching and Assessment: Assessment and Feedback Policy and the Course Monitoring and Review Procedures detail University processes for completing the assurance of learning process via:

  1. gathering data and monitoring course, major, specialisation and subject performance and student cohort outcomes; and
  2. reviewing and improving courses, majors, specialisations and subjects.
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Section 12 - UOW Curriculum Priorities

Embedding Curriculum Priorities into UOW Courses

(80) The University has a range of priorities that it will embed in all UOW coursework courses. They are summarised in this clause. UOW Curriculum Priorities may be varied from time to time by the Delegated Authority. The Delegated Authority may also from time to time waive compliance with these UOW Curriculum Priorities either generally or in specific cases.

Academic and English Language Skills

(81) To ensure University graduates have the communication skills to be competitive for the future employment, all UOW courses must explicitly enable and evidence communication skills development as part of the assurance of learning within a course consistent with the English Language Policy.

(82) This includes ensuring each course has an early assessment task within the course that will be used to identify students at risk due to English language proficiency.

First Year Experience

(83) All UOW coursework courses, undergraduate and postgraduate, must be designed to provide a discipline-specific, curriculum-integrated first year experience that enables students to learn how to learn and provides a critical foundation for future academic success.

Blended Learning

(84) UOW coursework combines diverse approaches, strategies and delivery methods to provide students with connected and purposefully designed synchronous and asynchronous learning experiences across a range of technology enhanced online and on campus delivery modes. There are several domains to blended learning design:

  1. The online learning environment - the informed and purposeful design of quality online learning environments (sites) within which digital learning and teaching practices take place for online, on-campus and mixed mode delivery methods.
  2. Learning and teaching experiences - the design of student-centred, inclusive, aligned, responsive and active learning and teaching practices and interactions that take place in online and on campus technology enhanced learning environments.
  3. Multimodal interactions- the considered use of multiple modes of representing information/content and designing student-centred, inclusive and engaging activities and communication opportunities.
  4. Learning Analytics - leveraging student interaction data for early interventions and to inform responsive enhancements to teaching practice; and
  5. Assessment and feedback- the design, alignment and balance of authentic formative and summative assessments and feedback practices that support students in the development and demonstration of their learning.

Capstones

(85) All UOW coursework courses provide students with a capstone experience: a major project, workplace or other authentic opportunity that integrates and applies the knowledge and skills gained throughout their course to real world problems.

Work Integrated Learning

(86) All UOW coursework courses must support the goal to widen and deepen Work Integrated Learning (WIL), activities that integrate work practices with learning, by embedding a collection of WIL activities throughout the course that:

  1. are informed by the ACEN Framework for Quality in WIL and the TEQSA WIL Guidance Note,
  2. are purposefully designed to engage students in, or to practice, meaningful work activities,
  3. draw on collaborations with industry or community in design, facilitation and/or feedback processes, 
  4. foster opportunities for reflection and engaged feedback, and
  5. shape and support students’ career goals through alignment with UOW’s Career Development Learning Framework.

(87) As a part of course design, all aspects of a coursework course must be mapped in COSMOS against the WIL Classification Framework. This framework includes activities that prepare students for WIL (Foundational WIL and Embedded WIL) and activities that include substantial WIL (Applied WIL and Professional WIL). UOW courses must aims to scaffold a variety of WIL activities across a course to develop students’ employability and career readiness.

Academic Integrity

(88) All UOW coursework courses must demonstrate how they support the goal to promote academic integrity and to minimise the risk of academic misconduct. This is achieved by:

  1. ensuring students are introduced to the concept of academic integrity and supported to acquire academic skills relevant to their course at an early stage; and
  2. designing assessment to minimise risks to academic integrity (for example by scaffolding of assessment tasks or avoiding high-stakes tasks).

(89) UOW higher degree research courses should incorporate all relevant UOW Curriculum Priorities into their design.

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Section 13 - Roles and Responsibilities

(90) The Course Portfolio Development Group is responsible for reviewing viability of proposals for courses and providing advice on their viability prior to their development in accordance with the requirements of these Procedures.

(91) Faculties are responsible for designing courses and subjects that meet the requirements of these Procedures.

(92) The Faculty Education Committee is responsible for reviewing and approving or endorsing proposals for courses and subjects that meet the requirements of these Procedures.

(93) The Quality Assurance Review Group is responsible for scrutinising course related and subject related proposals for adherence to these Procedures.

(94) The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic and Student Life) and the Academic Senate are responsible for final approval of proposals for new courses and significant amendments to existing courses that meet the requirements of these Procedures.

(95) The Academic Quality and Standards Division is responsible for maintaining and reviewing these Procedures.

(96) The Future Education Division is responsible for supporting faculties to design and develop courses and subjects that meet the requirements of these Procedures.

(97) Learning, Teaching and Curriculum are responsible for providing information, advice and consultation on the alignment of these Procedures to the University’s approach to higher education teaching and learning principles.

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Section 14 - Definitions

Word/Term Definition
100 level subject A subject at first year undergraduate level.
200 level subject A subject at second year undergraduate level.
300 level subject A subject at third year undergraduate level.
400 level subject A subject at fourth year undergraduate level.
800 and 900 level subjects Subjects at postgraduate level.
Academic item A course, major, specialisation, minor, field of education, subject or field of research.
Assurance of learning The quality assurance processes by which the University ensures that graduates of a course achieve stated educational outcomes.
Award course A course recognised under the Australian Qualifications Framework and approved by the Delegated Authority as an award or degree offered at the University of Wollongong. An award course leads to a higher education award as detailed in the Coursework Rules and the Higher Degree Research (HDR) Award Rules.
AQF The Australian Qualifications Framework.
AQF Levels An indication of the relative complexity and/or depth of achievement and the autonomy required to demonstrate that achievement. AQF level criteria describe the relative complexity and/or depth of achievement and the autonomy required to demonstrate that achievement for each AQF level.
Blended Learning Learning that connects purposefully designed synchronous and asynchronous learning experiences across a range of technology enhanced online and on campus delivery modes.
CAA Commission for Academic Accreditation is the government-run institutional licensure and degree accreditation organisation for private universities and their academic programs in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).
Capstone experience An experience through which students are able to integrate existing knowledge, consolidate skills, apply existing knowledge and skills, reflect on and evaluate their actions and develop their graduate or professional identity in an authentic setting. It may involve coursework, work-experience, a research or creative project, work placement, internship or professional practice. A capstone experience may be a subject, part of a subject or designed across several subjects in a course. The associated assessments typically assure the attainment of one or more Course Learning Outcomes.
Capstone subject A subject that is designed to provide students with a capstone experience.
Cognate courses Related courses at the same or different Australian Qualifications Framework levels (that may include nested courses, double degree courses, honours courses and/or extended versions of courses) that are in the same or related disciplines and collectively form an integrated suite of courses.
Contextualisation The adaptation of one or more elements of a subject to increase its relevance to the location and cultural context where the course is being delivered.
Core subject A core subject is a compulsory subject that must be completed in order to meet the requirements of a course, major study or minor study.
Co-requisite subject A subject which must be passed previously or taken concurrently with the subject for which it is prescribed.
Course A program of study consisting of a combination of subjects and other requirements, whether leading to a specific higher education award or not.
Credit The value assigned for the recognition of equivalence in content and learning outcomes between different types of learning and/ or qualifications.
Credit points Credit points are defined as the number value attached to a subject that indicates the study load.
Course structure Refers to the specific program of subjects which a student undertakes to meet the requirements of a course as specified in the Course Handbook for the year the course was commenced.
Delegated authority A person or body granted decision-making authority as detailed in the Delegations of Authority Policy.
Delivery mode A description of the delivery means and format through which learning and teaching methods and activities are enacted.
Double-badged subject A duplicate version of a subject originally designed for delivery as part of an AQF qualification type (typically a Bachelor degree) that is created for delivery as part of a different, usually higher, AQF qualification type (typically a postgraduate qualification type).
Double degree A double degree is an approved course containing two degree strands and leading to the conferral of two degrees upon a student who has complied with the course requirements for double degrees and the two individual course requirements inclusively.
EFTSL Equivalent Full Time Student Load.
Elective subject An elective subject is a subject the selection of which is optional for students meeting course, major study or minor study requirements.
Equivalent Two courses or two areas of major study or specialisations are equivalent when the structure of the course, major study or specialisation includes the same core subjects, has course, major or minor learning outcomes that share the same intent, and are assessed as being at the same level of the Australian Qualifications Framework.
Exit only course A course designed to allow a student who chooses to terminate their studies before completing the requirements of their original course to be awarded a formal degree, typically at a lower AQF level. Exit only courses are not open for direct admission.
Mixed mode A combination of online and face-to-face delivery where the face-to-face component is compulsory.
Generic learning outcomes Transferable, non-discipline specific skills a graduate may achieve through learning that have application in study, work and life contexts. The four broad categories in the Australian Qualifications Framework are: - fundamental skills; - people skills; - thinking skills and - personal skills.
Joint or Dual Awards A Joint Award involves the awarding of a single qualification that is jointly conferred by the University and one or more higher education providers. Joint Awards typically involve close cooperation in curriculum development, design, organisation, course delivery, and assessment of learning outcomes as well as requirements necessary for awarding the qualification. (TEQSA, 2013) A Dual Award involves the University and another entity offering a course of study that results in two separate qualifications being conferred by the two institutions. A dual award may involve one AQF level, or two sequential Australian Qualifications Framework levels – for example, two Masters degrees or a Bachelor and Diploma award. Dual awards may provide students with the opportunity to complete two awards in a shorter timeframe than if completed separately. (TEQSA, 2013)
Learning outcomes The expression of the set of knowledge skills and the application of the knowledge and skills a person has acquired and is able to demonstrate as a result of learning.
Major An approved combination of subjects related to a particular area or discipline offered by one or more academic units that have a minimum value of one third of the total undergraduate degree credit point requirements. The title of the major appears on the testamur.
Minor An academic item containing an approved combination of subjects related to a particular area or discipline that have a minimum value of 24 credit points offered by one or more academic units, of which 12 credit points should be at least 200 level or higher. The minor is recorded on the official academic transcript.
Mixed mode course delivery mode As defined in section 6 of these Procedures.
Mixed mode subject delivery mode As defined in section 6 of these Procedures.
Nested course An undergraduate or postgraduate course that is linked to a primary course that is also undergraduate or postgraduate, as the case may be, and typically at a lower AQF level to the primary course, through an articulation arrangement to enable multiple entry and/or exit points to and from the primary course.
Non-award course A course or unit of study (i.e., subject or short course) that is not recognised under the Australian Qualifications Framework but approved by the delegated authority as a non- award course or subject offered at the University of Wollongong.
On campus course delivery mode As defined in section 6 of these Procedures.
On campus subject delivery mode As defined in section 6 of these Procedures.
Online course delivery mode As defined in section 6 of these Procedures.
Online subject delivery mode As defined in section 6 of these Procedures.
Pre-requisite subject A subject which must be completed satisfactorily before a specified other subject or subjects may be attempted.
Principles of equivalence Two courses or two areas of major study or specialisations are equivalent when the course, major study or specialisation is designed and delivered in conformity with the Principles of Equivalence as set out in Appendix 17.
Qualification type descriptors The set of statements that describes the learning outcomes of each of the AQF qualification types in terms of knowledge, skills and the application of knowledge and skills.
Session A period in which subjects may be offered. Standard sessions are defined as Autumn, Spring, Summer, Annual and Trimesters 1, 2 and 3
Specialisation An approved combination of postgraduate subjects offered by one or more academic units related to a particular area or discipline which have a minimum value of eighteen (18) credit points. The title of the specialisation shall appear on the testamur.
Standard study load 1 EFTSL, or the equivalent of 48 credit points in a calendar year studying in Autumn and Spring sessions.
Student A person registered for a course.
Subject A self-contained unit of study identified by a unique code.
The University or UOW The University of Wollongong.
UOWD University of Wollongong in Dubai.
Vertically integrated A vertically integrated program of study comprising bachelor degree, offered in conjunction with further postgraduate study (typically at a Masters by Coursework level) in the same or a related discipline to enable the student to: - achieve admission into a relevant postgraduate degree course; and - receive specified credit from their bachelor degree towards the requirements of the postgraduate degree.
Volume of learning The notional duration of all activities required for the achievement of the learning outcomes specified for an AQF qualification type, expressed in equivalent full-time years.
Year A calendar year period of 12 months.
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Section 15 - Appendix 1: Business Rules for Credit Points and EFTSL

(98) Equivalent full-time student load (EFTSL) is the measure used to determine a student's study-load. EFTSL is sometimes required by external organisations or government departments such as Centrelink, as it provides a universal measurement of study load and is typically used to determine eligibility for payments and allowances.

(99) 1 EFTSL is the amount of student load determined by the University to be equal to a student’s full-time load for one year.

(100) A student studying a course full time in any year will generally have an EFTSL of 1, typically 48 credit points, and usually comprising 8 x 6 credit point subjects.

Calculating EFTSL

(101) An individual student’s EFTSL calculation will be based on the number of subjects in which they are enrolled.

Enrolled Units EFSTL Calculation
1 subject worth 6 credit points (1 x 6) ÷ 48 = 0.125 EFTSL
3 subjects each worth 6 credit points (normal single trimester load) (3 x 6) ÷ 48 = 0.375 EFTSL
4 subjects each worth 6 credit points (normal one session load) (4 x 6) ÷ 48 = 0.5 EFTSL
8 subjects each worth 6 credit points (normal full year load) (8 x 6) ÷ 48 = 1 EFTSL
9 subjects each worth 6 credit points (normal full year in trimester mode) (9 x 6) ÷ 48 = 1.125 EFTSL

(102) There may be variations to EFTSL at certain points in a course depending on the course type (Bachelor Pass/Honours) and subject delivery (e.g. annual subjects, subjects delivered in Trimester mode).

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Section 16 - Appendix 2: Course Design for an Undergraduate Certificate

Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Details Type Level
Undergraduate Certificate 5, 6 or 7
Naming Conventions Course Name Course Abbreviation
Undergraduate Certificate in [Field of Study] Example- Undergraduate Certificate in Science UGC [Field of Study Abbreviation] Example- UGCSci
Course Portfolio Principles Application An Undergraduate Certificate will typically be designed as an entry pathway into a Generalist Undergraduate course or a Profession Specific / Specialist Undergraduate Course.
Course Duration and Australian Qualifications Framework Volume of Learning The volume of learning of an Undergraduate Certificate is typically 6 months.
Qualification Pathways and Credit Arrangements Credit (up to 24 credit points) may be awarded for students articulating, upon successful completion of a nested Undergraduate Certificate, into a Diploma, Associate Degree or Bachelor Pass, Bachelor Double or Embedded Bachelor Honours Degree course.
Credit Points An Undergraduate Certificate must have a minimum of 24 credit points and include:
  1. a minimum of 18 credit points at 100 level when the course is designed and offered at AQF level 5;
  2. a minimum of 18 credit points at 200 level when the course is designed and offered at AQF level 6;
  3. a minimum of 18 credit points at 300 level when the course is designed and offered at AQF level 7.
Course Learning Outcomes Course content and course learning outcomes must be distinct from any cognate Level 5, 6 or 7 degrees to comply with Australian Qualifications Framework requirements.
Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Summary   Graduates at this level will have knowledge and skills for further study, professional upskilling, employment and participation in lifelong learning. An undergraduate certificate may be used to articulate with an existing qualification at AQF level 5, 6, or 7.
Australian Qualifications Framework Learning Outcomes Criteria and qualification type descriptors: Knowledge: Graduates at this level will have foundational knowledge sufficient to undertake qualifications at the 5, 6, or 7 AQF level. This may include the acquisition and application of knowledge in new or existing disciplines or professional areas. Knowledge and course content will be drawn from higher education units at AQF level 5, 6, or 7.
Skills: Graduates at this level will have foundational skills sufficient to undertake qualifications at the 5, 6 or 7 AQF level. This may include the acquisition and application of skills in new or existing disciplines or professional areas. Skills and course content will be drawn from higher education units at AQF level 5, 6, or 7.
Application of Knowledge and Skills: Graduates at this level will demonstrate a foundation of application of knowledge and skills sufficient to undertake qualifications at the 5, 6 or 7 AQF level. Application of knowledge and skills and course content will be drawn from higher education units at AQF level 5, 6 or 7.
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Section 17 - Appendix 3: Course Design for a Diploma

Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Details Type Level
Diploma 5
Naming Conventions Course Name Course Abbreviation
Diploma of [Field of Study] Example- Diploma of Engineering Dip [Field of Study Abbreviation] Example- Dip Eng
Course Portfolio Principles Application A Diploma will typically be designed as an entry pathway into or an exit pathway from a Generalist Undergraduate course or a Profession Specific / Specialist Undergraduate Course.
Course Duration and Australian Qualifications Framework Volume of Learning The volume of learning of a Diploma is typically 1 to 2 years.
Qualification Pathways and Credit Arrangements Credit (up to 48 credit points) may be awarded for students articulating into an Associate Degree or Bachelor Pass, Bachelor Double or Bachelor Honours Degree course upon successful completion of a nested Diploma.
Credit Points A Diploma must have a minimum of 48 credit points and include predominantly 100 level subjects.
Course Learning Outcomes Course content and course learning outcomes must be distinct from any cognate Level 5 award to comply with Australian Qualifications Framework requirements.
Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Summary   Graduates at this level will apply integrated technical and theoretical concepts in a broad range of contexts to undertake advanced skilled or paraprofessional work and as a pathway for further learning.
Australian Qualifications Framework Learning Outcomes Criteria and qualification type descriptors: Knowledge: Graduates of a Diploma will have technical and theoretical knowledge and concepts, with depth in some areas within a field of work and learning.
Skills: Graduates of a Diploma will have:
  1. cognitive and communication skills to identify, analyse, synthesise and act on information from a range of sources;
  2. cognitive, technical and communication skills to analyse, plan, design and evaluate;
  3. approaches to unpredictable problems and/or management requirements;
  4. specialist technical and creative skills to express ideas and perspectives;
  5. communication skills to transfer knowledge and specialised skills to others and demonstrate understanding of knowledge.
Application of Knowledge and Skills: Graduates of a Diploma will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills:
  1. with depth in some areas of specialisation, in known or changing contexts;
  2. to transfer and apply theoretical concepts and/or technical and/or creative skills in a range of situations;
  3. with personal responsibility and autonomy in performing complex technical operations with responsibility for own outputs in relation to broad parameters for quantity and quality;
  4. with initiative and judgement to organise the work of self and others and plan, coordinate and evaluate the work of teams within broad but generally well-defined parameters.
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Section 18 - Appendix 4: Course Design for an Associate Degree

Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Details Type Level
Associate Degree 6
Naming Conventions Course Name Course Abbreviation
Associate Degree in [Field of Study] Example- Associate Degree in Business AD [Field of Study Abbreviation] Example- ADB
Course Portfolio Principles Application An Associate Degree will typically be designed as an exit pathway from a Bachelor Degree course.
Course Duration and Australian Qualifications Framework Volume of Learning The volume of learning of an Associate Degree is typically 2 years.
Qualification Pathways and Credit Arrangements Credit (up to 96 credit points) may be awarded for students articulating into a Bachelor Pass, Bachelor Double or Bachelor Honours Degree course upon successful completion of a nested Associate Degree.
Credit Points A 2 year Associate Degree must have a minimum of 96 credit points and include:
  1. a minimum of 24 credit points at 100 level;
  2. a minimum of 24 credit points at 200 level.
Course Learning Outcomes Course content and course learning outcomes must be distinct from any cognate Level 6 Degrees to comply with Australian Qualifications Framework requirements.
Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Summary   Graduates at this level will be qualified to apply underpinning technical and theoretical knowledge in a range of contexts to undertake paraprofessional work and as a pathway for further learning.
Australian Qualifications Framework Learning Outcomes Criteria and qualification type descriptors: Knowledge: Graduates at this level will have broad theoretical and technical knowledge with some depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines.
Skills: Graduates at this level will have:
  1. cognitive skills to identify, analyse and evaluate information and concepts from a range of sources;
  2. cognitive, technical and creative thinking skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge and ideas with some depth in a discipline;
  3. cognitive, communication and analytical skills to interpret and transmit responses to sometimes complex problems;
  4. communication skills to make a clear and coherent presentation of knowledge and ideas with some intellectual independence.
Application of Knowledge and Skills: Graduates at this level will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills:
  1. with initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in paraprofessional practice;
  2. to adapt knowledge and skills in a range of contexts and/or for further studies in one or more disciplines;
  3. to adapt fundamental principles, concepts and techniques to known and unknown situations;
  4. with responsibility and accountability for own learning and work and in collaboration with others within broad parameters.
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Section 19 - Appendix 5: Course Design for a Bachelor Pass Degree

Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Details Type Level
Bachelor 7
Naming Conventions Course Name Course Abbreviation
Bachelor of [Field of Study] Example- Bachelor of Creative Arts B [Field of Study Abbreviation] Example- BCA
Bachelor of [Field of Study] (Scholar) Example- Bachelor of Arts (Scholar) B [Field of Study Abbreviation] (Schol) Example- BA(Schol)
Course Portfolio Types   Bachelor Degrees should fall into one of the Course Portfolio Types listed here: Generalist Undergraduate Course
Generalist Undergraduate Courses:
  1. are centred on broad based discipline areas (Science/Arts etc.) rather than narrow fields of study, sub-disciplines or profession-specific areas of study;
  2. incorporate a range of areas of major study;
  3. incorporate common first year unless this is impractical to do so;
  4. provide students with the option of a second major or a minor study;
  5. may provide students with the option of a double degree, ideally in combination with a profession specific undergraduate course (see Appendix 6);
  6. may provide students with opportunities to undertake postgraduate study using the Vertically Integrated Degree Course model;
  7. should include exit pathways in the form of sub-bachelor (e.g. Undergraduate Certificate, Diploma, or Associate Degree) courses.
Profession-Specific/Specialist Undergraduate Course
Profession-Specific/Specialist Undergraduate Courses:
  1. are named degree courses with names aligned to the relevant profession or specialist discipline areas;
  2. have more prescribed structures including, where majors are available, a common first year;
  3. include major study options that are appropriate only for profession specific degrees, where they align to discrete professional employment pathways;
  4. are 3 or 4 years in duration and offer students options to graduate with Pass and Embedded Honours degrees;
  5. are aligned to accreditation or professional registration requirements;
  6. have Applied Work Integrated Learning or Professional Work Integrated Learning as core features.
Enhanced Courses for Academic High-Achievers
Enhanced Courses for Academic High Achievers:
  1. have distinct course learning outcomes (compared to cognate courses);
  2. have curriculum content that differentiate them from any cognate course; and
  3. have a strong and consistent ‘identity’ for the courses and the cohorts they are intended to attract, including:
     a. the naming protocol ‘Scholars’;    
     b. what enhancements are available; and      
     c. entry requirements.
Course Duration and Australian Qualifications Framework Volume of Learning The volume of learning of a Bachelor Degree is typically 3 – 4 years.
Qualification Pathways and Credit Arrangements Credit may be awarded for students articulating into a vertically integrated Masters Degree course upon successful completion of a Bachelor Pass Degree forming part of a vertically integrated degree program.
Credit Points A 3 year Bachelor Degree must have a minimum of 144 credit points and include:
  1. a minimum of 36 credit points at 100 level;
  2. a maximum of 60 credit points at 100 level;
  3. a minimum of 24 credit points at 300 level.
A 4 year Bachelor Pass Degree must have a minimum of 192 credit points and include:
  1. a minimum of 36 credit points at the 100 level;
  2. a maximum of 60 credit points at the 100 level;
  3. a minimum of 24 credit points at the 300 level.
Course Learning Outcomes Course content and course learning outcomes must be distinct from any cognate Level 7 Degrees to comply with Australian Qualifications Framework requirements.
Major Study A Major Study in a Bachelor Degree is an approved combination of subjects offered by one or more academic units which have:
  1. a minimum value of 48 credit points;
  2. a minimum of 24 credit points at 300 level or higher.
Where a Bachelor Degree has a core of 96 credit points or more, a Major Study may be approved by the Delegated Authority as comprising less than the minimum credit points prescribed, provided the Major Study is at least 24 credit points and is made up of at least 18 credit points of subjects at 300 level or higher.
Minor Study A Minor Study in a Bachelor Degree, is an approved combination of subjects offered by one or more academic units which have:
  1. a minimum value of 24 credit points;
  2. at least 12 credit points at 200 level or higher.
Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Summary   Graduates at this level will have broad and coherent knowledge and skills for professional work and/or further learning.
Australian Qualifications Framework Learning Outcomes Criteria and qualification type descriptors: Knowledge: Graduates of a Bachelor Degree will have broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning. Graduates at this level will have broad and coherent theoretical and technical knowledge with depth in one or more disciplines or areas of practice.
Skills: Graduates at this level will have well-developed cognitive, technical and communication skills to select and apply methods and technologies to:
  1. analyse and evaluate information to complete a range of activities;
  2. analyse, generate and transmit solutions to unpredictable and sometimes complex problems;
  3. transmit knowledge, skills and ideas to others;
Graduates of a Bachelor Degree will have:
  1. cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge;
  2. cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas;
  3. cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence;
  4. communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas.
Application of Knowledge and Skills: Graduates at this level will apply knowledge and skills to demonstrate autonomy, well-developed judgement and responsibility:
  1. in contexts that require self-directed work and learning;
  2. within broad parameters to provide specialist advice and functions.
Graduates of a Bachelor Degree will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills:
  1. with initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship;
  2. to adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts;
  3. with responsibility and accountability for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters.
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Section 20 - Appendix 6: Course Design for a Bachelor Double Degree

(103) The design of a Bachelor Double Degree is to be guided by the requirements of a single Bachelor Degree (as outlined in Appendix 5) and by the requirements specified below.

Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Details Type Level
Bachelor 7 or 8
Naming Conventions Course Name Course Abbreviation
Bachelor of [Field of Study] - Bachelor of [Field of Study] Example: Bachelor of Arts – Bachelor of Laws Example: Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) – Bachelor of Laws B [Field of Study Abbreviation] - B [Field of Study Abbreviation] Example: BA-LLB Example: BE(Hons) - LLB
The two degrees should be separated by a dash (-) and displayed as such in all documentation provided by the University of Wollongong. The degree of the owning faculty is listed first, with the exception of:
  1. the Bachelor of Laws, which is always listed last; and
  2. degrees that are listed first due to marketing, promotional or accreditation requirements.
Where both degrees are owned by the same Faculty, the degree names must be ordered alphabetically.
Course Portfolio Type/s   Double Degree Course
Double Degree Courses should typically be used to combine generalist degrees with opportunities to study a profession-specific course
Course Duration and Australian Qualifications Framework Volume of Learning The volume of learning of a Bachelor Double Degree is between 4.5 and 7 years.
Credit Points Bachelor Double Degrees - where the constituent degrees are:
  1. 3yr + 3yr, the double degree must have a minimum of 192 credit points
  2. 4yr + 3 yr, the double degree must have a minimum of 240 credit points
  3. 4yr + 4 yr, the double degree must have a minimum of 288 credit points
Credit point values within each strand should be determined taking account of the credit point guidance for the relevant Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Type in Appendix 5 (Bachelor Pass Degree) and Appendix 7 (Bachelor Honours Degree).
Course Learning Outcomes In order for a Bachelor Double Degree course to be compliant with the requirements of the Australian Qualifications Framework, it is necessary to demonstrate that any reduction in credit points from those required to complete the two constituent degree courses separately is justified on the basis of complementary course learning outcomes within the strands of the double degree program.
Major Study A Major Study is an approved combination of subjects offered by one or more academic units which have:
  1. a minimum value of 48 credit points;
  2. a minimum of 24 credit points at 300 level or higher.
Where a bachelor degree being completed as one strand of a double degree has a core of 84 credit points or more, a Major study may be permitted to be less than the minimum prescribed, however the Major must not be less than 24 credit points and must be predominantly made up of subjects at 300 level or higher.
Minor Study A Minor Study in a Bachelor Degree, is an approved combination of subjects offered by one or more academic units which have:
  1. a minimum value of 24 credit points;
  2. at least 12 credit points at 200 level or higher.
Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Summary – Level 7 Bachelor Pass Double Degree   Graduates at this level will have broad and coherent knowledge and skills for professional work and/or further learning.
Australian Qualifications Framework Learning Outcomes Criteria and Qualification Type Descriptors – Level 7 Bachelor Pass Double Degree Knowledge: Graduates of a Bachelor Degree will have broad and coherent body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines as a basis for independent lifelong learning. Graduates at this level will have broad and coherent theoretical and technical knowledge with depth in one or more disciplines or areas of practice.
Skills: Graduates at this level will have well-developed cognitive, technical and communication skills to select and apply methods and technologies to:
  1. analyse and evaluate information to complete a range of activities;
  2. analyse, generate and transmit solutions to unpredictable and sometimes complex problems;
  3. transmit knowledge, skills and ideas to others.
Graduates of a Bachelor Degree will have:
  1. cognitive skills to review critically, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge;
  2. cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas;
  3. cognitive and creative skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence;
  4. communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas.
Application of Knowledge and Skills: Graduates at this level will apply knowledge and skills to demonstrate autonomy, well-developed judgement and responsibility:
  1. in contexts that require self-directed work and learning;
  2. within broad parameters to provide specialist advice and functions.
Graduates of a Bachelor Degree will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills:
  1. with initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making in professional practice and/or scholarship;
  2. to adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts;
  3. with responsibility and accountability for own learning and professional practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameters.
Note: For a Bachelor Double Degree with one or both strands comprising an Australian Qualifications Framework Level 8 Honours Degree, relevant details of the Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Summary and the Australian Qualifications Framework Learning Outcomes Criteria and Qualification Type Descriptors are set out in Appendix 7 below.
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Section 21 - Appendix 7: Course Design for a Bachelor Honours Degree

Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Details Type Level
Bachelor Honours 8
Naming Conventions Course Name Course Abbreviation
Bachelor of [Field of Study] Honours Example: Bachelor of Arts (Honours) Note: UOW has received authority to award the Level 8 Bachelor of Research without an Honours designation. B [Field of Study Abbreviation] (Hons) Example: BA(Hons)
Course Portfolio Type/s   Higher Degree Research Pathway
Honours courses are typically characterised as either:
  1. Professional honours courses. That is, profession-specific 4 year courses where embedded honours are either incorporated (e.g. Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)) or available as an option (e.g. Bachelor of Primary Education (Honours)); or
  2. Academically focussed honours courses. That is, discipline specific honours courses, both embedded (e.g. Bachelor of Medical Biotechnology (Honours)) and end-on (e.g. Bachelor of Science (Honours)).
See the Honours Policy for further details.
Course Duration and Australian Qualifications Framework Volume of Learning The volume of learning of a Bachelor Honours Degree is typically either;
  1. 1 year, as an end-on Bachelor Honours Degree or;
  2. 4 years in the case of an embedded Bachelor Honours Degree.
Credit Points An end-on Honours course, is academically focused and consists of at least 48 credit points including:
  1. a minimum of 12 credit points at 400-level, excluding honours thesis or project subject;
  2. a 400-level thesis or project subject with value of at least 24 credit points.
A 4 year embedded Honours course must consist of at least 192 credit points including:
  1. a minimum of 36 credit points at 100-level;
  2. a maximum of 60 credit points at 100-level;
  3. a minimum of 24 credit points at 300-level;
  4. a minimum of 36 credit points at 400-level, including the honours thesis or project subject;
  5. a 400-level thesis or project subject or subjects with value of:
     a. at least 12 credit points (for Professional honours courses); or      
     b. at least 24 credit points (for all other honours courses). Unlimited    credit points at 800 or 900 level may be used, provided the subjects are available to students.
Structural Options for an embedded Bachelor Honours Degree
  1. All students enrol in an embedded four year Bachelor Honours course, at the conclusion of which students graduate with a degree “Bachelor of (Course Name) (Honours)” either with or without a merit descriptor (Class I, Class II and Class III); or
  2. Students enrol in a four year Level 7 Bachelor Pass course, with the option of seeking approval to transfer to a cognate four year Bachelor Honours course, at the conclusion of which students graduate with a degree “Bachelor of (Course Name) (Honours)” either with or without a merit descriptor (Class I, Class II and Class III); or
  3. Students enrol in a four year Level 8 Bachelor Honours course, at the conclusion of which students graduate with a degree “Bachelor of (Course Name) (Honours)” either with or without a merit descriptor (Class I, Class II and Class III), but also have the option of seeking approval to transfer to a four year Bachelor Pass Degree should they not satisfy the requirements for the Honours degree; or
  4. Students enrol in a three year Level 7 Bachelor Pass course, with the option of seeking approval to transfer to a cognate four year Bachelor Honours course, subject to performance at the point of seeking a transfer, and at the conclusion of which students graduate with a degree “Bachelor of (Course Name) (Honours)” either with or without a merit descriptor (Class I, Class II and Class III.
Honours Project Component
  1. The assessment component and the delivery session must be clearly listed on the relevant honours guide (or, in the case of professionally focussed honours courses, the relevant subject outline).
  2. A program of study should be available for students undertaking their honours project part-time.
  3. The course handbook must clearly list the relevant honours grade calculation method, as set out in the Honours Policy.
Other requirements related to the design of the Honours Project are set out in the Teaching and Assessment: Assessment and Feedback Policy.
Course Learning Outcomes The Australian Qualifications Framework requirements are that to graduate with a Level 8 Bachelor Honours degree, the student must demonstrate:
  1. the development of advanced knowledge;
  2. the application of knowledge and skills “...to plan and execute project work and/or a piece of research and scholarship with some independence”; and
  3. “knowledge of research principles and methods.”
Major Study A Major Study in a 4 year Bachelor Honours Degree is an approved combination of subjects offered by one or more academic units which have:
  1. a minimum value of 48 credit points;
  2. a minimum of 24 credit points at 300 level or higher.
Where a specialist four year bachelor honours degree has a core study of 96 credit points or more, a major study may be permitted to be less than the minimum prescribed, however the major must not be less than 24 credit points and must be made up of at least 18 cp of subjects at 400 level or higher.
Minor Study A Minor Study in a 4 year Bachelor Honours Degree, is an approved combination of subjects offered by one or more academic units which have:
  1. a minimum value of 24 credit points;
  2. at least 12 credit points at 200 level or higher.
Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Summary   Graduates at this level will have advanced knowledge and skills for professional/highly skilled work and/or further learning.
Australian Qualifications Framework Learning Outcomes Criteria and qualification type descriptors: Knowledge: Graduates at this level will have advanced theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more disciplines or areas of practice. Graduates of a Bachelor Honours Degree will have coherent and advanced knowledge of the underlying principles and concepts in one or more disciplines and knowledge of research principles and methods.
Skills: Graduates at this level will have expert advanced cognitive, technical and communication skills to select and apply methods and technologies to:
  1. analyse critically, evaluate and transform information to complete a range of activities;
  2. analyse, generate and transmit solutions to complex problems;
  3. transmit knowledge, skills and ideas to others.
Graduates of a Bachelor Honours Degree will have:
  1. cognitive skills to review, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge to identify and provide solutions to complex problems with intellectual independence;
  2. cognitive and technical skills to demonstrate a broad understanding of a body of knowledge and theoretical concepts with advanced understanding in some areas;
  3. cognitive skills to exercise critical thinking and judgement in developing new understanding;
  4. technical skills to design and use research in a project;
Communication skills to present a clear and coherent exposition of knowledge and ideas to a variety of audiences.
Application of Knowledge and Skills: Graduates at this level will apply knowledge and skills to demonstrate autonomy, well-developed judgement, adaptability and responsibility as a practitioner or learner. Graduates of a Bachelor Honours Degree will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills:
  1. with initiative and judgement in professional practice and/or scholarship;
  2. to adapt knowledge and skills in diverse contexts;
  3. with responsibility and accountability for own learning and practice and in collaboration with others within broad parameter;
To plan and execute project work and/or a piece or research ad scholarship with some independence.
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Section 22 - Appendix 8: Course Design for a Graduate Certificate

Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Details Type Level
Graduate Certificate 8
Naming Conventions Course Name Course Abbreviation
Graduate Certificate in [Field of Study] Example: Graduate Certificate in Public Health GCert [Field of Study Abbreviation] Example: GCertPubHlth
Course Duration and Australian Qualifications Framework Volume of Learning The volume of learning of a Graduate Certificate is typically 0.5 year.
Credit Points A Graduate Certificate course is 24 credit points and is comprised of 800 and/or 900 Level subjects.
Qualification Pathways and Credit Arrangements Credit (up to 24 credit points) may be awarded for students articulating into a Graduate Diploma or Masters Degree course upon successful completion of a nested Graduate Certificate.
Course Learning Outcomes
  1. In order to comply with the Australian Qualifications Framework, exit only Graduate Certificates must contain different learning outcomes from the Level 8 and/or Level 9 course with which they are associated.
  2. Australian Qualifications Framework requirements are that to graduate with a Level 8 Graduate Certificate degree, the student must demonstrate the development of specialised knowledge. In order to comply with this requirement, all Level 8 Graduate Certificates must contain sufficient subjects and/or subject content to meet the requirement for the development of ‘specialised knowledge’.
Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Summary   Graduates at this level will have advanced knowledge and skills for professional/highly skilled work and/or further learning.
Australian Qualifications Framework Learning Outcomes Criteria and qualification type descriptors: Knowledge: Graduates at this level will have advanced theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more disciplines or areas of practice. Graduates of a Graduate Certificate will have specialised knowledge within a systematic and coherent body of knowledge that nay include the acquisition and application of knowledge and skills in a new or existing discipline or professional area.
Skills: Graduates at this level will have expert advanced cognitive, technical and communication skills to select and apply methods and technologies to:
  1. analyse critically, evaluate and transform information to complete a range of activities;
  2. analyse, generate and transmit solutions to complex problems;
  3. transmit knowledge, skills and ideas to others.
Graduates of a Graduate Certificate will have:
  1. cognitive skills to review, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge and identify and provide solutions to complex problems
  2. cognitive skills to think critically and to generate; and evaluate complex ideas;
  3. specialised technical and creative skills in a field of highly skilled and/or professional practice;
  4. communication skills to demonstrate an understanding of theoretical concepts;
  5. communication skills to transfer complex knowledge and ideas to a variety of audiences.
Application of Knowledge and Skills: Graduates at this level will apply knowledge and skills to demonstrate autonomy, well-developed judgement, adaptability and responsibility as a practitioner or learner. Graduates of a Graduate Certificate will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills:
  1. to make high level, independent judgements in a range of technical or management functions in varied specialised contexts;
  2. to initiate, plan, implement and evaluate broad functions within varied specialised technical and/or creative contexts;
  3. with responsibility and accountability for personal outputs and all aspects of the work or function of others within broad parameters.
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Section 23 -  Appendix 9:Course Design for a Graduate Diploma

Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Details Type Level
Graduate Diploma 8
Naming Conventions Course Name Course Abbreviation
Graduate Diploma in [Field of Study] Example: Graduate Diploma in Educational Studies GDip [Field of Study Abbreviation] Example: GDipEdStd
Course Duration and Australian Qualifications Framework Volume of Learning The volume of learning of a Graduate Diploma is typically 1 year.
Credit Points A Graduate Diploma is 48 credit points. A Graduate Diplomas that is broadening and that operates as a pathway course towards a Masters Degree will have a maximum of 24 credit points at 900 Level, with the remaining credit points at 800 Level. A deepening or specialist Graduate Diploma may have up to 48 credit points at 900 Level.
Qualification Pathways and Credit Arrangements Credit (up to 24 credit points) may be awarded for students progressing into a Graduate Diploma course upon successful completion of a nested Graduate Certificate course. Credit (up to 48 credit points) may be awarded for students progressing into a Masters course upon successful completion of a nested Graduate Diploma course.
Course Learning Outcomes - In order to comply with the Australian Qualifications Framework, exit only Graduate Diplomas must contain different learning outcomes from the Level 8 and/or Level 9 course with which they are associated. - Australian Qualifications Framework requirements are that to graduate with a Level 8 Graduate Diploma degree, the student must demonstrate the development of advanced knowledge. In order to comply with this requirement, all Level 8 Graduate Diplomas must contain subjects and/or subject content that involve the development of ‘advanced knowledge’.
Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Summary   Graduates at this level will have advanced knowledge and skills for professional/highly skilled work and/or further learning.
Australian Qualifications Framework Learning Outcomes Criteria and qualification type descriptors: Knowledge: Graduates at this level will have advanced theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more disciplines or areas of practice. Graduates of a Graduate Diploma will have advanced knowledge within a systematic and coherent body of knowledge that nay include the acquisition and application of knowledge and skills in a new or existing discipline or professional area The content and learning activities of each course of study engage with advanced knowledge and inquiry consistent with the level of study and the expected learning outcomes, including: - current knowledge and scholarship in relevant academic disciplines; - study of the underlying theoretical and conceptual frameworks of the academic disciplines or fields of education or research represented in the course; and - emerging concepts that are informed by recent scholarship, current research findings and, where applicable, advances in practice.
Skills: Graduates at this level will have expert advanced cognitive, technical and communication skills to select and apply methods and technologies to: - analyse critically, evaluate and transform information to complete a range of activities; - analyse, generate and transmit solutions to complex problems; - transmit knowledge, skills and ideas to others. Graduates of a Graduate Diploma will have: - cognitive skills to review, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge and identify and provide solutions to complex problems; - cognitive skills to think critically and to generate and evaluate complex ideas; - specialised technical and creative skills in a field of highly skilled and/or professional practice; - communication skills to demonstrate an understanding of theoretical concepts; - communication skills to transfer complex knowledge and ideas to a variety of audiences.
Application of Knowledge and Skills: Graduates at this level will apply knowledge and skills to demonstrate autonomy, well-developed judgement, adaptability and responsibility as a practitioner or learner Graduates of a Graduate Diploma will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills: - to make high level, independent judgements in a range of technical or management functions in varied specialised contexts; - to initiate, plan, implement and evaluate broad functions within varied specialised technical and/or creative contexts; - with responsibility and accountability for personal outputs and all aspects of the work or function of others within broad parameters.
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Section 24 -  Appendix 10: Course Design for a Master Degree (Coursework)

Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Details Type Level
Master (Coursework) 9
Naming Conventions Course Name Course Abbreviation
Master of [Field of Study] Example: Master of Science M [Field of Study Abbreviation] Example: MSci
Master of [Field of Study] Extension Example: Master of Public Health Extension The use of the qualification title ‘Doctor of…’ is permitted for a Masters Degree (Extended) for five professions: medical practice, physiotherapy, dentistry, optometry and veterinary practice. Currently UOW has one UOW Australian Qualifications Framework Master (Extended) degree, the Doctor of Medicine. M [Field of Study Abbreviation] Ext Example: MPHExt  
Course Portfolio Type/s   Profession Specific/Specialist Postgraduate Course
Profession-Specific / Specialist Postgraduate Courses may comprise either:
  1. an accelerated 1 year Masters Degree Course comprised entirely of 900-level subjects for students with an AQF level 8 qualification (or equivalent professional experience or as a pathway from a Bachelor Degree Course in the same or a related discipline as part of a vertically integrated degree program package);
  2. a 1.5 year professional Masters Degree Course.
  3. a 2 year Masters Extension Degree Course
These courses may have nested Graduate Certificates and/or Graduate Diplomas within them.
  Integrated Masters – Vertically Integrated Masters Degree
Integrated Masters Degrees are not double degree programs. Instead, vertically integrated degrees are designed to allow undergraduate Bachelor Degree students to follow a prescribed path during their undergraduate course in order to:
  1. achieve admission into a relevant postgraduate degree course in the same or a related discipline; and
  2. receive specified credit from their Bachelor degree towards the requirements of the Masters Degree.
Course Duration and Australian Qualifications Framework Volume of Learning The volume of learning for a Master Degree (Coursework) is typically 1-2 years.
Credit Points There are three credit point options for Master Degree (Coursework):
  1. A 1 year Master Degree of 48 credit points.
  2. A 1.5 year Master Degree of 72 credit points.
  3. A 2 year Master Degree of 96 credit points.
These courses have a minimum of 48 credit points at 900 Level, with the remaining credit points at 800 Level.
Qualification Pathways and Credit Arrangements
  1. Graduate Certificate courses may be offered as nested qualifications within Masters Degree courses to allow students to meet appropriate entry requirements for postgraduate study and to proceed into a Level 9 course. Graduate Diploma courses may also be offered as nested qualifications within Masters courses.
  2. Credit (up to 24 credit points) may be awarded for students progressing into a Masters Degree course upon successful completion of a nested Graduate Certificate.
  3. Credit (up to 48 credit points) may be awarded for students progressing into a Masters course upon successful completion of a nested Graduate Diploma course.
  4. Credit may be awarded for students articulating into a vertically integrated Masters Degree course upon successful completion of a Bachelor Pass Degree or Bachelor Double Degree that forms part of a vertically integrated degree program.
Masters Capstone Requirements Australian Qualifications Framework requirements are that to graduate with a Level 9 Masters by Coursework degree, the student must demonstrate a body of knowledge that includes the understanding of recent developments in a discipline and/or area of professional practice and application of knowledge and skills “...to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, capstone experience and/or piece of scholarship.” In order to comply with this requirement, all Masters by Coursework courses must contain:
  1. subjects and/or subject content that assure the following:
     a. understanding of recent developments in a discipline and/or area of professional practice;      b. development of knowledge of research principles and methods,      c. some independent research; and  2. either:      a. a substantial capstone experience subject (minimum 6 credit points in value); or      b. a research project subject of 6 credit points’ value or more (through which students may develop knowledge of research principles and methods and conduct some independent research).
Specialisation A specialisation in a Masters Degree (Coursework) is an approved combination of postgraduate subjects offered by one or more academic units which have a minimum value of eighteen (18) of the credit points for the degree.
Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Summary   Graduates at this level will have specialised knowledge and skills for research, and/or professional practice and/or further learning.
Australian Qualifications Framework Learning Outcomes Criteria and qualification type descriptors: Knowledge: Graduates at this level will have advanced and integrated understanding of a complex body of knowledge in one or more disciplines or areas of practice The content and learning activities of each course of study engage with advanced knowledge and inquiry consistent with the level of study and the expected learning outcomes, including:
  1. current knowledge and scholarship in relevant academic disciplines;
  2. study of the underlying theoretical and conceptual frameworks of the academic disciplines or fields of education or research represented in the course; and
  3. emerging concepts that are informed by recent scholarship, current research findings and, where applicable, advances in practice.
Graduates of a Masters Degree (Coursework) will have:
  1. a body of knowledge that includes the understanding of recent developments in a discipline and/or area of professional practice;
  2. knowledge of research principles and methods applicable to a field of work and or learning.
Skills: Graduates at this level will have expert, specialised cognitive and technical skills in a body of knowledge or practice to independently:
  1. analyse critically, reflect on and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories;
  2. research and apply established theories to a body of knowledge or practice;
  3. interpret and transmit knowledge, skills and ideas to specialist and non-specialist audiences.
Graduates of a Masters Degree (Coursework) will have:
  1. cognitive skills to demonstrate mastery of theoretical knowledge and to reflect critically on theory and professionally practice or scholarship;
  2. cognitive, technical and creative skills to investigate, analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories and to apply established theories to different bodies of knowledge or practice;
  3. cognitive, technical and creative skills to generate and evaluate complex ideas and concepts at an abstract level;
  4. communication and technical research skills to justify and interpret theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences;
  5. technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice or scholarship.
Application of Knowledge and Skills: Graduates at this level apply knowledge and skills to demonstrate autonomy, expert judgement, adaptability and responsibility as a practitioner or learner. Graduates of a Masters Degree (Coursework) will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills:
  1. with creativity and initiative to new situations in professional practice and/or further learning;
  2. with high level personal autonomy and accountability;
  3. to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, capstone experience and/or piece of scholarship.
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Section 25 -  Appendix 11: Course Design for a Master Degree (Research)

Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Details Type Level
Master (Research) 9
Naming Conventions Course Name Course Abbreviation
Master of Research MRes
Master of Philosophy MPhil
Course Portfolio Type/s   Higher Degree Research Course
Higher Degree Research Masters Courses should be comprised of one of the following:
  1. Integrated Masters Degree – Master of Research typically articulating from an AQF Level 8 Bachelor of Research degree;
  2. Thesis Only Masters Degree – Master of Philosophy.
Course Duration and Australian Qualifications Framework Volume of Learning The volume of learning for a Master Degree (Research) is typically 2 years.
Credit Points An Integrated Master Degree (Research) must comprise of 96 credit points including:
  1. 48 coursework credit points at 800 or 900 Level (for which credit may be granted on successful completion of the Bachelor of Research course);
  2. a thesis subject of 48 credit points at 900 level.
A Master of Philosophy must comprise of 96 credit points of which 72 credit points is comprised of a thesis subject.
Qualification Pathways and Credit Arrangements Master Degree (Research)
  1. Entry is from a 3 year undergraduate degree, an Honours degree or a Coursework Masters.
  2. Credit of up to 48cp can be given for successful completion of an Honours, the Bachelor of Research or a Coursework Masters degree.
Master of Philosophy
  1. Entry to the degree is from an Honours degree or a Coursework Masters degree.
Course Learning Outcomes Australian Qualifications Framework requirements are that to graduate with a Level 9 Masters by Research degree, the student must demonstrate application of knowledge and skills “...to plan and execute a substantial piece of research” and ‘advanced knowledge of research principles and methods.”. Courses must contain subjects and/or subject content that introduce and develop advanced knowledge of research principles and methods.
Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Summary   Graduates at this level will have specialised knowledge and skills for research, and/or professional practice and/or further learning.
Australian Qualifications Framework Learning Outcomes Criteria and qualification type descriptors: Knowledge: Graduates at this level will have advanced and integrated understanding of a complex body of knowledge in one or more disciplines or areas of practice. Graduates will have:
  1. a body of knowledge that includes the understanding of recent developments in one or more disciplines;
  2. advanced knowledge of research principles and methods applicable to the field of work or learning;
  3. knowledge of research principles and methods applicable to a field of work and or learning.
Skills: Graduates at this level will have expert, specialised cognitive and technical skills in a body of knowledge or practice to independently:
  1. analyse critically, reflect on and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories;
  2. research and apply established theories to a body of knowledge or practice;
  3. interpret and transmit knowledge, skills and ideas to specialist and non-specialist audiences.
Graduates will have:
  1. Cognitive skills to demonstrate mastery of theoretical knowledge and to reflect critically on theory and its application.
  2. Cognitive, technical and creative skills to investigate, analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories and to apply established theories to different bodies of knowledge or practice.
  3. Cognitive, technical and creative skills to generate and evaluate complex ideas and concepts at an abstract level.
  4. Cognitive, technical and creative skills to design, use and evaluate research and research methods.
  5. Communication and technical skills to present a coherent and sustained argument and to disseminate research results to specialist and non-specialist audiences.
  6. Technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise and disseminate research that makes a contribution to knowledge.
Application of Knowledge and Skills: Graduates at this level apply knowledge and skills to demonstrate autonomy, expert judgement, adaptability and responsibility as a practitioner or learner. Graduates will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills:
  1. with creativity and initiative to new situations and/or further learning;
  2. with high level personal autonomy and accountability;
  3. to plan and execute a substantial piece of research.
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Section 26 - Appendix 12: Course Design for a Doctoral Degree

Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Details Type Level
Doctoral 10
Naming Conventions Course Name Course Abbreviation
Doctor of Philosophy With the exception of:
  1. Doctor of Creative Arts
  2. Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Psychology)
PhD   DCA PhD(ClinPsyc)
Doctor of Philosophy (Integrated) PhD (Int)
Course Portfolio Type/s   Higher Degree Research Courses
Doctoral Degrees are categorised as one of the following:
  1. The Doctor of Philosophy which is typically comprised of research training and completion of a thesis.
  2. The Doctor of Philosophy (Integrated) which consists of coursework, research training and thesis components.
Course Duration and Australian Qualifications Framework Volume of Learning The volume of learning for a Doctoral Degree is typically 4 years.
Credit Points
  1. The Doctor of Philosophy and the Doctor of Creative Arts are 192 credit points, comprised entirely of thesis subject/s. All subjects are at 900 level.
  2. The Doctor of Philosophy (Integrated) is 192 credit points consisting of 48 credit points of coursework subjects at and 144 credit points of thesis subject/s. All subjects are at 900 level.
  3. The Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Psychology) is 192 credit points and consists of 36 credit points of coursework subjects, a 24 credit point practicum and 132 credit points of thesis subject/s. All subjects are at 900 level.
Course Learning Outcomes Australian Qualifications Framework requirements are that to graduate with a Level 10 Doctoral degree, the student must have:
  1. a substantial body of knowledge “...at the frontier of a field of work or learning”;
  2. “substantial knowledge of research principles and methods applicable to the field of work or learning.”
Doctoral courses must contain:
  1. subjects and/or subject content that introduce, develop and assure substantial knowledge of research principles and methods; and
  2. a thesis based subject.
Australian Qualifications Framework Qualification Summary   Graduates at this level will have systematic and critical understanding of a complex field of learning and specialised research skills for the advancement of learning and/or for professional practice.
Australian Qualifications Framework Learning Outcomes Criteria and qualification type descriptors: Knowledge: Graduates at this level will have systemic and critical understanding of a substantial and complex body of knowledge at the frontier of a discipline or area of professional practice. Graduates of a Doctoral Degree will have:
  1. a substantial body of knowledge at the frontier of a field of work or learning including knowledge that constitutes an original contribution;
  2. substantial knowledge of research principles and methods applicable to the field of work or learning.
Skills: Graduates at this level will have expert, specialised cognitive, technical and research skills in a discipline area to independently and systematically:
  1. engage in critical reflection, synthesis and evaluation;
  2. develop, adapt and implement research methodologies to extend and redefine existing knowledge or professional practice;
  3. disseminate and promote new insights to peers and the community;
  4. generate original knowledge and understanding to make a substantial contribution to a discipline or area of professional practice.
Graduates of a Doctoral Degree will have:
  1. cognitive skills to demonstrate theoretical knowledge and to reflect critically on that theory and practice;
  2. cognitive skills and use of intellectual independence to think critically, evaluate existing knowledge and ideas, undertake systematic investigation and reflect on theory and practice to generate original knowledge;
  3. expert technical and creative skills applicable to the field of work or learning;
  4. ommunication skills to explain and critique theoretical propositions, methodologies and conclusions;
  5. communication skills to present cogently a complex investigation of originality or original research for external examination against international standards and to communicate results to peers and the community;
  6. expert skills to design, implement, analyse, theorise and communicate research that makes a significant and original contribution to knowledge and/or professional practice.
Application of Knowledge and Skills: Graduates at this level will apply knowledge and skills to demonstrate autonomy, authoritative judgement, adaptability and responsibility as an expert and leading practitioner or scholar. Graduates of a Doctoral Degree will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills:
  1. with intellectual independence;
  2. with initiative and creativity in new situations and/or further learning;
  3. will full responsibility and accountability for personal outputs;
  4. to plan and execute original research;
  5. with the ongoing capacity to generate new knowledge including in the context of professional practice.
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Section 27 - Appendix 13: Table – Guide on the Use of Double Badged Subjects

Subject Level Can be used in Graduate Certificate? Can be used in Graduate Diplomas? Can be used in Masters by Coursework Degrees?
400 Level Subject
  1. Yes, as an 800 Level subject.
  2. No modification required.
  3. No restriction on credit points per course.
  1. Yes, as an 800 Level subject.
  2. No modification required.
  3. No restriction on credit points per course.
  1. Yes, as an 800 Level subject without modification.
  2. Yes, as a 900 Level subject with appropriate modification of subject learning outcomes and assessment.
  3. Overall limit of 18 cp per course for 72 cp Masters or 24 cp per course for 96 cp Masters.
  4. At least 48 cp of Masters degree must comprise 900 level subjects.
200 and 300 Level Subject
  1. Yes, as an 800 Level subject.
  2. No modification required to assessment or subject learning outcomes.
  3. Limit of 6 cp per course.
  1. Yes, as an 800 Level subject.
  2. No modification required to assessment or subject learning outcomes.
  3. Limit of 12 cp per course.
  1. Yes, as an 800 Level subject.
  2. No modification required to assessment or subject learning outcomes.
  3. Yes, as a 900 Level subject with appropriate modification of subject learning outcomes and assessment.
  4. Overall limit of 18 cp per course for 72 cp Masters or 24 cp per course for 96 cp Masters.
  5. At least 48 cp of Masters degree must comprise 900 level subjects.
100 Level Subject
  1. Not permitted without delegated authority approval in exceptional circumstances.
  1. Not permitted without delegated authority approval in exceptional circumstances.
  1. Not permitted without delegated authority approval in exceptional circumstances.
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Section 28 - Appendix 14: Principles of Equivalence

Equivalence Elements

(104) Elements of the course and curriculum relevant to an assessment of equivalence include:

  1. Course Structure;
  2. Learning Outcomes;
  3. Subject Content;
  4. Subject Delivery;
  5. Assessment; and
  6. Learning Support.

Course Structure

(105) To be equivalent, courses must contain all UOW core subjects but may also contain additional core subjects if required due to local accreditation requirements.

(106) In most courses Course Learning Outcomes are assured in core subjects. If Course Learning Outcomes are assured in elective subjects, care must be taken to ensure that these Course Learning Outcomes are assured for all students, regardless of which electives they take. This can typically be achieved through the application of properly designed course rules, pre-requisites and/or co-requisites.

(107) In exceptional circumstances, equivalence may be achieved through content and assessment set out across an identifiable group of subjects

(108) Fewer majors may be offered at other locations, provided that students can still achieve the overall Course Learning Outcomes.

(109) If a delivery location wishes to offer a major or specialisation not offered at the University, approval for the major must be obtained from the University through the normal course approval processes, including discussion with the relevant faculty at the University. There must be a satisfactory solution to quality assuring the major or specialisation.

(110) Fewer, more, or other electives may be offered at different locations.

(111) Study sequences may vary, taking account of pre-requisites and local constraints, e.g. more limited subject offerings.

(112) Each course and the delivery of the course must be done consistent with UOW teaching and learning policies and procedures applicable to the delivery location.

Course Learning Outcomes

(113) The Course Learning Outcomes for all courses must be consistent with the AQF level descriptors.

(114) The intent of the Course Learning Outcomes must be the same across all locations. However, by agreement, the actual wording might vary to meet local accreditation requirements, e.g. offshore accreditation requirements in the UAE may reference different educational foundations.

(115) Higher Research Degrees with coursework are considered equivalent if the Course Learning Outcomes are the same, and any related coursework together with the thesis assure the Course Learning Outcomes.

Assurance of Course Learning Outcomes

(116) To be equivalent:

  1. the intent of the Course Learning Outcomes should be the same, and as noted under 2a, assessments that assure Course Learning Outcomes must be taken by all students.
  2. assessment tasks which assure Course Learning Outcomes should provide appropriate assessment of the Course Learning Outcomes, typically by using the same assessment type. The precise wording of the assessment may vary, while keeping the meaning, e.g. incorporating local scenarios, appropriate wording for the local context, or to meet the relevant local accreditation authority’s expectations.
  3. marking criteria and rubrics may vary, provided they are appropriate for the assessment task and the Course Learning Outcome(s) being assured.
  4. the weighting of tasks which demonstrate assurance of Course Learning Outcomes should be similar (+/- 10%).

Review Process

(117) Confirmation that course structure and course learning outcomes remain equivalent is undertaken both as part the annual review process and as part of periodic course reviews.

(118) Changes to the Course Structure or Course Learning Outcomes may be made outside a review process. Such changes should be discussed between the University and the offshore location early in the process and be approved by the appropriate body, depending on the nature of the changes made.

Subject Content

(119) To be equivalent:

  1. the Subject Learning Outcomes must be consistent with the AQF level descriptors for the level at which the subject is delivered.
  2. the intent of the Subject Learning Outcomes must be the same. However by agreement, the actual wording might vary to meet local accreditation requirements in the offshore location. Additional Subject Learning Outcomes may be included where relevant to the local context, provided all learning outcomes are appropriately assessed.
  3. subject content in core subjects should be the same in terms of the development and application of knowledge and skills but may be contextualised to provide locally relevant examples, and as noted under 2a, Course Structure, ensure that these Course Learning Outcomes are assured for all students.
  4. subject content in elective subjects should be the same in terms of knowledge and skills developed, but may be contextualised to provide locally relevant examples.
  5. subject to the above, the emphasis given to or the time spent on particular topics may vary.
  6. contextualisation of readings, examples and cases is encouraged where appropriate. For example, a textbook with more local or international examples which covers the same content may be useful in a business subject. While technical subjects may be less likely to contextualise, it is noted that a small number of local examples are already used in Engineering subjects.
  7. each subject and the delivery of the subject must meet relevant UOW teaching and learning policies and procedures applicable to the delivery location.

Subject Delivery

(120) To be equivalent:

  1. the overriding consideration for equivalence is whether students are supported in achieving the Course Learning Outcomes.
  2. subject to pedagogical considerations being considered, delivery models may vary according to local requirements such as face to face teaching hours, day/evening time delivery, intensive models, duration of sessions, as agreed between UOW and the offshore location. Agreed variations should be documented.

(121) Contextualisation of learning activities in all subjects (core and elective) is encouraged where appropriate. For example, a local case study, an exploration of the local impact of a global issue, or a comparative analysis of Australian and local issues can help students apply their knowledge.

Assurance of Subject Learning Outcomes

(122) To be equivalent:

  1. assessment Tasks which assure both Subject Learning Outcomes and Course Learning Outcomes should be equivalent.
  2. assessment Tasks which assure Subject Learning Outcomes but not Course Learning Outcomes may vary by agreement, for valid reasons such as the following:
    1. Some assessment types may only be possible with small cohorts. If such assessment types provide a better way of assuring the learning outcomes, then they may be used. The size of the cohort at each location should therefore be considered when reviewing equivalence.
    2. Similarly, teaching and learning activities and assessments for laboratory classes may vary due to differences in equipment and infrastructure available. This should also be considered, i.e. as long as the learning outcomes from the laboratory component are achieved, there may be some variation in lab resources and assessment.
  3. marking criteria may vary provided they are appropriate for the assessment task and the Course and/or Subject Learning Outcomes being assured.

Learning Support

(123) To be equivalent:

  1. equivalence of learning support is not course or subject specific.
  2. the nature of such support may be customised to suit student needs and the support agreed between UOW and the offshore location.
  3. requirements for course progression must be considered.

Timing of Changes

(124) The time needed for an offshore location to implement changes to course and/or subjects should be reflected in the course approval process, and should include implementing planned transition arrangements.

(125) This could result in a period where an offshore location is still working to a previous course structure, until they receive approval from local accreditation bodies. Such periods should be minimised. Agreement on the timing of changes should be documented.

(126) It is expected that all parties will work together in a collegiate fashion, in line with the above principles.

Implementation of the Principles of Equivalence

(127) These principles will be adapted for other locations, before incorporating in the following policies and procedures:

  1. UOW Standards and Quality Framework for Learning and Teaching;
  2. Course Policy;
  3. Course Design Procedures;
  4. Course and Subject Approval Procedures - New Offerings and Discontinuations;
  5. Course and Subject Approval Procedures (Faculty Delegated Course and Subject Amendments);
  6. Course Monitoring and Review Procedures;
  7. Collaborative Delivery of a UOW Course Policy Suite;
  8. Teaching and Assessment - Code of Practice - Teaching;
  9. Teaching and Assessment: Assessment and Feedback Policy;
  10. Teaching and Assessment: Subject Delivery Policy.